Jean Turgeon Shares His Memories

These memories were kindly shared by Jean Turgeon whose family spent the summers in Rawdon in Paradis’ log house on Albert Street.

During the war, 1940-1943 these visits were  suspended.

The summers of 1944 and 1945, Jean and his brother were sent to board at Mrs. Burn’s Rest-a-While guest house at the corner of 4th Ave. and Albert Street.

Every fall McFadden, a horse dealer from out west, hired a CNR box car to bring a load of horses to sell in Rawdon. The horses, with the help of several volunteers, drove the horses up to an empty lot at the foot of the hill on Albert Street lot, later Arnoldware Rogers Plastics was built on this lot.

Needless to say the horses were of great interest to many, particularly young boys. Jean remembered falling off one of these unbroken horses when attempting to ride it bare back without a bridle.

Across the street from this empty lot was Selwyn Copping’s steam powered

Every fall McFadden, a horse dealer from out west, hired a CNR box car to bring a load of horses to sell in Rawdon. The horses, with the help of several volunteers, drove the horses up to an empty lot at the foot of the hill on Albert Street lot, later Arnoldware Rogers Plastics was built on this lot.

Needless to say the horses were of great interest to many, particularly young boys. Jean remembered falling off one of these unbroken horses when attempting to ride it bare back without a bridle.

Jean remembered being impressed that the Montreal Star came by train -the same day it was published!!

I was appointed “Fetcher of the Stars” for Mrs. Ted Copping who had a restaurant on 4th Avenue. Weekdays the train with the Star arrived just before supper time. On Saturdays it came earlier, at 3:30 p.m.

The train also brought many tourists to Rawdon, so many that extra passenger cars were added on weekends. 

There was always a mad dash of taxis to the station when a train was due to arrive or leave. 

Ted Copping, owner of the restaurant on 4th Avenue, also ran a taxi service. first with a team of horses and then with a large automobile in summer, the team of horses and sleigh in winter. His horses were a large, handsome team, admired by all as they stepped proudly through the streets pulling passengers in a wagon or sleigh.

There are no Coppings listed in the the Rawdon Telephone Directory. (2008)

Central Terminus Building

The bus stop, in the Central Terminus building on Queen Street was filled to capacity on summer weekends.

A restaurant on the 1st floor of this new building also sold the bus tickets. Buses arrived and departed at the rear of the building.

Bell Telephone operators were housed in the building until automatic dialling came to Rawdon in 1960.

There was also a taxi stand on each side of the street. The Royal Taxi was across the street at the side of the Manoir Hotel. The small building seen to the right of the Bus Terminus was the “office” of The Standard Taxi Service.

Haddad’s Restaurant

I remember dancing in the back room at Haddad’s Restaurant. “Star Dust” was a favourite choice on the Nickelodeon.

Reggie Purcell’s House

We rented boats from Reggie Purcell, who lived next door to the restaurant. He was a carpenter and had built wooden stairs behind his house leading to the dock below. His sister Hazel worked in the post office across the street. These buildings exist today in other uses, and somewhat modified.

Dr. Smiley

I vaguely remember Dr. Smiley, he had a black car with a rumble seat.

Kiosk on Rawdon Lake

Before the War there were regattas on the Rawdon Lake near the dam on 3rd Avenue.

CNR Station

Mr. Latter, the CNR  engineer, retired in 1956 when the train service was to be discontinued. I remember that before the War he was rumoured to be making $3000 a year, a fortune in the depression. He lived in a large brick house on Metcalfe Street.